Curiosity as an approach to marketing

Ideas-come-from-curiosity-free-printable-2

We’ve probably all heard marketing people say that we should try to write texts which spark curiosity as it is the best way to get people interested in our products and services and to get their attention long enough to read our marketing texts and website copy.

But what about curiosity as an approach to marketing?

This idea came to me recently as I was thinking about how people feel in relation to marketing. I know that, in the past, I have procrastinated on my marketing. Not because I was lazy, but because I was very attached to the outcome. I wanted to be able control the result – and since I obviously couldn’t do this, my mind helped me out by creating a story about what was going to happen: “Nobody will read my letters. Nobody will be interested. I don’t have enough experience. Other people can do this job better than me. The statistical return is only 1-3% anyway. It’s a waste of time.“ And once that negativity creeps in, it really isn’t easy to overcome it. I’m pretty sure that I’m not the only one who has ever felt like that.

Turn it around

So what about trying a different approach? What if we were able to completely detach from the outcome – not easy, I know, when you need clients and you need the income – and look at marketing from the point of view of curiosity?

Now I know what you’re thinking, “Oh it’s all right for her. She already has plenty of clients. I, on the other hand, really need the clients and I really need the income.“ Ok, I hear you. But this is simply you attaching even more to an outcome over which you have no control – irrespective of how much you may feel you need or want to control it. And how exactly does that help you? All you are actually doing, in fact, is adding even more pointless emotional stress to a situation which is already difficult for you.

A change of focus

Now if you take the curiosity approach you could say to yourself, “Ok, I have never done this before, but I’m going to try sending out 100 letters to potential clients and see what happens.“ This way you are detaching emotionally from the result and approaching the matter with interest and openness – positive rather than negative emotions, positive rather than negative energy. This will already feel like, and indeed be, a big step forward. What is more, regardless of whether the marketing measure you choose first is successful or not, you will (a) be a step closer to learning what does and doesn’t work in your target market, and (b) have some experience under your belt, which means that next time round the emotional hurdle won’t be so high.

Remain curious

Perhaps next time you will try heading to an event attended by your target clients or a trade fair for your industry. Or maybe you’ll look into participating in a workshop or a CPD event aimed at your potential clients. No, I can’t tell you and you won’t be able to say in advance whether these options will be successful in terms of getting you those new clients you want and need, but you will, through curiosity and trial and error, be able to determine which marketing options are best suited to you and, if you run a survey or ask every new client who comes your way how they found you (which I highly recommend by the way), then, over time, you will be able to ascertain which marketing methods are working best for your business.

 

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3 thoughts on “Curiosity as an approach to marketing

  1. Hi Karen. You made a good point! I recognize this emotional load attached to my marketing efforts. This is even more so because I am rather a perfectionist (at least in some respects) and this really creates a block, especially in connection with social media in my case.
    Yet I realize that I have used your ‘curiosity approach’ with success when going to networking events or even when talking to people at such events, and I often had really good conversations. People like it when you are really interested in what they do and who they are. Thanks for the good blog!

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