Translating in one direction or both – your choice to make

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Today’s post is an English translation with slight adaptations from an article I first published on my German blog. When reviewing the site stats for Translator Mentoring Blog earlier this week, I found that the most popular post by far continues to be Should I only translate into my native language? which suggests that this topic is one which translators, especially those just starting out, struggle to get their heads around. This is hardly surprising with so much conflicting information out there, apparent rules, requests which seem to run counter to these “rules”, and strong opinions. So I thought that my readers might be interested in this article which is a brief summary of the main points I discussed at a workshop last year. A longer article is soon to be published. Please feel free to e-mail me if you would like a copy.

The future of the translation industry – what will translator training look like in the future?

In September 2015 an interesting invitation landed in my inbox. I was being invited to speak at a workshop entitled “Foreign Language for Future Language Professionals: Reassessing Market Needs and Training Programmes” in Trieste, Italy. The seminar was being organised by the University of Trieste and the European Union and would address, among other things, the topics of translator training and translation competence into the non-native language and the extent to which this is necessary given the native speaker principle which appears to dominate the industry.

As a representative of the translation industry, in my presentation I wanted to set the advantages of the native speaker principle against my experience of the requirements and needs of corporate clients and to explain why translators must be extremely competent in their foreign language(s), irrespective of whether they translate into their non-native language or not.

The native speaker principle

Personally I am and will remain a proponent of the native speaker principle, but purely because this happens to fit my own personal circumstances. The main argument in favour of the native speaker principle is that it ensures that the translation is linguistically and grammatically flawless. In many cases, this is, of course, of utmost importance. However, being a native speaker of the target language alone is in no way sufficient to ensure that the translation also properly accurately conveys the source text message – and this must surely always be at the very top of the list of objectives.

The native language of the translator therefore is only one factor which must be considered when commissioning a translation. Equally important is whether the translator understands the source text, i.e. the level of his/her foreign language competence and specialist technical language of the subject-field concerned. Only if the translator has a very good command of the foreign language and the specialist technical language, can he/she produce an accurate translation into his/her mother tongue.

Unfortunately, this second point is often ignored when applying the native speaker principle.

From ideals to reality

What is more, academic rules and ideals (“only translate into your native language”) are often not in line with the requirements of the industry and the needs of clients. It is increasingly the case that companies and clients are looking for their internal translators to meet all of their translation needs. Perhaps a company has a regular translation requirement and therefore wants to employ an internal translator, but doesn’t have enough translation work for it to make economic sense to employ one translator per language pair, let alone one translator per language direction. In such cases, it clearly makes business sense to employ one translator who can offer all of the language pairs required in both directions. But even companies which work with external translators are increasingly looking for a one-stop shop – often due to time constraints and concerns relating to confidentiality.

Translator training

Whether future translation graduates translate only into their own mother tongue or in both directions is, in my view, a question which each new translator must decide for him/herself. There will always be a market for translators who only offer the highest quality translations into their own mother tongue, providing that they also have extensive specialist knowledge in their field. However, there will also always be a market for translators wanting to translate in both directions.

Whatever the decision these translators make, it is, however, extremely important that they are given the opportunity during their training to increase their foreign language competence to the highest possible level and to polish their writing skills in the foreign language because, irrespective of whether they later decide to translate into the foreign language or not, one thing is for sure: in order to be successful in today’s translation industry, more than average foreign language competence is absolutely essential, not least for marketing purposes and communicating effectively with clients.

Your choice

So ultimately there is no “right” or”wrong”. Whether you decide to translate in one direction or both is simply a choice that you, as a businessman or businesswoman, are free to make on the basis of your skillset, your strengths and weaknesses and your vision. Know that whatever choice you make, there are clients out there for you – it is your job to find the ones which are the right fit for you.

 

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Curiosity as an approach to marketing

Ideas-come-from-curiosity-free-printable-2

We’ve probably all heard marketing people say that we should try to write texts which spark curiosity as it is the best way to get people interested in our products and services and to get their attention long enough to read our marketing texts and website copy.

But what about curiosity as an approach to marketing?

This idea came to me recently as I was thinking about how people feel in relation to marketing. I know that, in the past, I have procrastinated on my marketing. Not because I was lazy, but because I was very attached to the outcome. I wanted to be able control the result – and since I obviously couldn’t do this, my mind helped me out by creating a story about what was going to happen: “Nobody will read my letters. Nobody will be interested. I don’t have enough experience. Other people can do this job better than me. The statistical return is only 1-3% anyway. It’s a waste of time.“ And once that negativity creeps in, it really isn’t easy to overcome it. I’m pretty sure that I’m not the only one who has ever felt like that.

Turn it around

So what about trying a different approach? What if we were able to completely detach from the outcome – not easy, I know, when you need clients and you need the income – and look at marketing from the point of view of curiosity?

Now I know what you’re thinking, “Oh it’s all right for her. She already has plenty of clients. I, on the other hand, really need the clients and I really need the income.“ Ok, I hear you. But this is simply you attaching even more to an outcome over which you have no control – irrespective of how much you may feel you need or want to control it. And how exactly does that help you? All you are actually doing, in fact, is adding even more pointless emotional stress to a situation which is already difficult for you.

A change of focus

Now if you take the curiosity approach you could say to yourself, “Ok, I have never done this before, but I’m going to try sending out 100 letters to potential clients and see what happens.“ This way you are detaching emotionally from the result and approaching the matter with interest and openness – positive rather than negative emotions, positive rather than negative energy. This will already feel like, and indeed be, a big step forward. What is more, regardless of whether the marketing measure you choose first is successful or not, you will (a) be a step closer to learning what does and doesn’t work in your target market, and (b) have some experience under your belt, which means that next time round the emotional hurdle won’t be so high.

Remain curious

Perhaps next time you will try heading to an event attended by your target clients or a trade fair for your industry. Or maybe you’ll look into participating in a workshop or a CPD event aimed at your potential clients. No, I can’t tell you and you won’t be able to say in advance whether these options will be successful in terms of getting you those new clients you want and need, but you will, through curiosity and trial and error, be able to determine which marketing options are best suited to you and, if you run a survey or ask every new client who comes your way how they found you (which I highly recommend by the way), then, over time, you will be able to ascertain which marketing methods are working best for your business.

 

The truth about your marketing issues

truth

“I hate marketing”, “I really should do some marketing”, “I just don’t think marketing is for me”, “I’m a linguist, I’m just not good at the business side”, “I know what I need to do in theory but somehow I never get round to it”. Ever heard any of these or said something similar yourself? If so, read on!

What makes marketing into such a big (negative) thing for so many people?

We all know the theory: marketing is essential for every business. It brings you new clients which makes sure that your business grows and thrives. Marketing is for your business what exercise is for your body. We don’t have to exercise, but if we don’t we’ll be unfit. It’s the same with marketing: if we want a healthy business we need to do it. Let’s draw another comparison: chores around the house. Probably not your favourite thing, certainly not mine. And we may put them off and put them off but eventually we’ll get round to doing them. For some people not doing any marketing really is purely and simply about procrastination. It’s just something they rarely make time to do. For many people, however, marketing isn’t simply a chore like the washing and ironing that they put off but do get round to doing eventually. Marketing is something that they don’t want to touch with barge pole. They may get as far as dipping their big toe in but then they get the barge pole out again and it’s back to square one. Ring any bells?

So what’s going on here?

Unlike chores which we may simply dislike, people tend to have a deeper emotional relationship with their feelings towards marketing. If you get round to other chores eventually but not to your marketing then this might be true for you. Let’s explore this idea some more.

So you know what marketing is, you know it’s good for your business, you’ve been to seminars and attended webinars, you’ve probably also read a few books on the subject but somehow this is the furthest you have got. Let’s take a look at why that might be.

When you think about marketing what emotions do you feel? If you’ve “simply” been dismissing marketing as something you just don’t like for a long time then you might need to sit quietly for a while and really listen to what your body is telling you. Perhaps you can relate to one or more of these responses:

  • Fear of the unknown – What if nobody is interested in my services? What if everyone is interested in my services? How will I handle that?
  • Lack of control – What if none of my prospects respond?
  • Rejection – What if my prospects aren’t interested? What if they reject me?
  • Lack of confidence – What if I’m not good enough? What if potential clients find out that I don’t have much experience? I’m not as self-confident as my website suggests, what if my prospects find out?

These are all viable and typical responses and they all stem from programmes which we have been running since early childhood. So the reason why so many people are unsuccessful with their marketing efforts is that although they are trying to implement tried and tested techniques, they haven’t started at the root of the problem. They’re trying to start somewhere higher up. It’s like spending thousands on renovating a house but not bothering to deal with the unsteady foundations or like trying to heal an illness by only treating the symptoms.

Ok so now what?

First of all don’t be tempted to run away from the uncomfortable feelings. Simply feel them and then start to examine them. Take them apart piece by piece and ask questions like “is this true for me now?”, “do I really believe this?”, “is this a likely outcome or am I simply making up stories?”, “is a rejection of my services really the same as a rejection of me as a person?”. This kind of introspection work can be extremely insightful. You may discover that some of the stories your mind is making up are pretty far-fetched and extreme scenarios. You can then start asking questions like “is this the only way I can see this?”, “what if I look at it in another way?”

Perspective is a powerful tool because your thoughts determine your experience. If you can be open to the unknown, do your marketing in good faith, focus on the possibility of creating new connections and finding new clients rather than on the potential for rejection and accept that you (can) have little control over the outcome, you will find marketing a much more straight-forward and less burdensome task which may still feel like a chore but will hopefully no longer be something you fear to such an extent that it paralyses you into inaction.

 

 

Photo credit: Leigh Blackall, flickr.com

Mastermind groups and how they can benefit translators

Mastermind

I was very excited when Karen asked me to write a guest post about mastermind groups, because I absolutely love mine. I look forward to the session and always come out feeling that I’ve made progress. So let’s jump right in and talk about what a mastermind group is, what the benefits are, and some factors to consider when putting a group together.

What is a mastermind group?

A mastermind group consists of like-minded people who come together to support each other in moving their businesses forward. The idea is to meet for regular, structured sessions in which each participant takes a turn at being in the limelight for an agreed period of time. When it’s your turn, you get to report on what’s happened since the last meeting, and then talk about things you’re currently working on, asking the group for feedback and ideas. You typically come away with a few action items that you plan to work on in the period before the next meeting.

Beyond that, the mastermind group can be set up according to the requirements and preferences of those involved. The number of people in the group can vary, as can the length or frequency of meetings. Some mastermind groups meet locally and face-to-face; others are online.

What are the benefits?

Reality Check
Sometimes it’s easier to see things clearly if you have to explain them to other people. As you start to explain, you realise where the gaps are and what you have to perhaps work on a bit more.

On the other hand, it could be that your mastermind buddies notice that you’re really on to something and encourage you to pursue it.

Challenge
When discussing an issue or an idea, you may realise that you’re basing your thinking on certain assumptions, and by asking questions such as “why do you think that?” or “why not?” the other participants may help you to realise that these assumptions are not necessarily true.

Brainstorming
When you’re working on something new, other participants can act as a sounding board, offering feedback and asking questions to help you refine your concept. Even hearing suggestions that you don’t like can help you figure out what you do want.

Extended Network
Participants benefit from each other’s networks. It often happens that you need something doing, and another person will say “I know someone who can help with that”. So your network expands.

Experience
People bring different experiences and perspectives to the table. If one of you is facing a particular situation and isn’t sure how to handle it, it can help to talk things through, discuss various strategies or play through scenarios.

Accountability
For me, one of the most important aspects of the masterminding group is accountability. If I make a commitment to, say, write a blog post before the next meeting, I find it easier to be disciplined and actually do it, knowing that I’ll be asked about it when we meet again. Of course there are no consequences if I choose not to do my action items, but I find that the act of writing them down and telling the others in the group is very motivating.

Encouragement
After working with people in a mastermind group for a while, you get to understand their journey, and you know exactly what it means when they say “Hey, I achieved X this week!” It’s great to be able to offer and receive praise and encouragement.

Social Contact
You get to go out for breakfast! Well obviously not if you’re meeting on Skype, and of course it doesn’t have to be a breakfast meeting, but in my case we meet at a café and discuss business over scrambled egg and cappuccino. Whether online or face-to-face, it’s good to get out of your own head once in a while and meet with like-minded people.

What do you need to consider when setting up a mastermind group?

My mastermind group grew organically out of a couple of networking meetings where we felt we all got on well and could help each other. If you’re thinking of putting a group together, here are a few things to consider:

Trust
One of the most important things is that you feel comfortable with the others in the group. A mastermind group works best if you can talk openly, knowing that what you say will be treated confidentially. And since we often talk about ideas in their early stages, it’s important to know that nobody’s going to run off with them.

Balance
The whole point of a mastermind group is that everyone has something to add, everyone benefits. So it’s important to have a feeling of balance – otherwise it can turn into a one-way coaching session, which is not necessarily beneficial for the person in the coaching role.

Similar yet Different
Your mastermind buddies should be people you can relate to and who will understand what you’re going through. But at the same time it is tremendously beneficial to be in a group of people with complementary skills, different ways of thinking and networks that don’t overlap too much.

An important factor to consider is whether you want to be in a group with people from your industry or from a mix of industries. There are advantages to both approaches: people from your own industry will have a good understanding of issues you may be facing, while people from other industries bring a fresh perspective.

Commitment
The mastermind concept works best if all of you are committed to meeting up regularly, so it’s important to find people who, perhaps after a trial period, are prepared to stick at it in the medium to long term.

How to find mastermind buddies

There are as many ways to find mastermind buddies as there are to network. Mastermind concepts are offered in various business groups on Facebook or LinkedIn. Alternatively you could join up with colleagues you’ve met at conferences or networking events, or interacted with online.

I’ll offer just a couple of links out of many:

One of my own mastermind buddies, Thomas Lorbacher, now offers a Germany-based service that brings like-minded people together to form mastermind groups (http://mastermind.covisto.de/)

And there is a brand-new Facebook group that offers a platform for translators interested in mastermind groups or other types of collaboration (https://www.facebook.com/groups/standingoutexchange)

I would definitely recommend joining (or forming) a mastermind group. I’ve come to know my mastermind buddies very well and we all help each other stay on track with our businesses. Add to that the opportunity to go out for breakfast every two weeks, and you’ve got a winning combination.

Author: Jane Eggers is a British freelance translator who lives in Heidelberg, Germany and specialises in IT and all-round English-language support for small businesses. Her website is here: www.jane-eggers-translations.de.

Content Marketing for Translators – What You Need to Know

SEO

Would you like to fill your website with content that your customers love and improves search engine rankings but aren’t yet on first name terms with SEO & Co? No problem – in this guest post, Katharine Eyre presents 5 tips on how you can optimise your web presence with even the smallest of budgets.

Content marketing

The concept of “content marketing” has enjoyed a firm place in US corporate life for several years now; now it is slowly being recognised in Europe. Content marketing is a type of online marketing which does not have the sale of goods and services as its primary objective, but the supply of relevant, informative and entertaining web content to the internet user. This content could take the form of a blog, a white paper or tips for using a product manufactured by the company behind the website.

By offering a continual flow of quality content, the credibility of the company grows – as does the level of trust by the customer. In this way, long term customer relationships are built and maintained. In short: with a well thought-through and consistent content marketing strategy, the chances increase that a visitor to your website becomes a customer and that a one-off commission becomes a long-term business relationship.

Making content marketing work for translators

As a translator, it’s difficult to assert yourself on the market and distinguish yourself from other service providers. However, with good content marketing, it is possible to gain an advantage over the competition.

Since many translators are sole traders who have only small marketing budgets, the production of the right content marketing strategy is a must. Only in this way can you choose and take the most suitable measures for your target group – thus using your available resources in the most efficient and economical way.

With these particularities of the translation industry in mind, I have put together the following 5 content marketing tips for translators.

#1 – Give your website a spring clean!

The first step in any content marketing strategy is to take an inventory of your website. Check for outdated content, “dead” links, contradictions and overlaps. I recommend entering all the pages of your website into an Excel table inventory, recording which content is contained on which page (text, pictures, info-graphics etc.). You can then use this as a basis to decide which content requires amendment, which content should be removed from the website and which new content needs to be produced.

#2 – Make a customer profile

The customer is always at the centre of any content marketing strategy. The content you provide has to gain his interest and keep it. In order to get to know your customer, I recommend putting together a customer profile. This could (for example) cover the following characteristics: age, sex, nationality, job, relationship status or hobbies. The more characteristics your profile considers, the more accurately you can tailor your web content towards the needs and wants of the customer.

#3 – Feed your website regularly

Google loves new content and rewards websites which are constantly updated with fresh content with better rankings in the search results. For you, this means that filling your website with content is no longer a one-off job, but an ongoing project which you have to keep going besides your core translation activities.

If you have a blog, be sure to publish at least one new article every month. Other regular features, such as a “Word of the Week” or information on seminars which you hold, should also be refreshed as often as possible.

#4 – Spread the word

Another method with which you can raise your visibility on the internet is to publish your content on other websites, e.g. networking platforms such as “Xing” or “LinkedIn”. In the marketing business, this technique is referred to as “seeding” – you sow your content on ground belonging to others in the hope that your business will grow.

By seeding your content, you are highlighting your special competencies and skills and are seen by more people – who may well need a translation at some point!

#5 – Thy shalt learn to love SEO

Do not be scared of these three letters! With a little bit of knowledge and a little bit of instinct, you can configure your website in such a way – structurally, technically but above all regarding content – that Google can easily understand and interpret it.

Here, there is no getting around detailed keyword research. By keywords, I mean those fundamental concepts which describe the main content of a website. This also includes word combinations. Which keywords are selected will depend on your customer – think not only about what you offer (e.g. “Translation”, “Italian”, “Arabic”), but also what words the customer may type into the search engine while looking for such services (e.g. “technical translations”, “law”, “German” or “contract”).

Once you have chosen your keywords, it is time to integrate them into your website in the most advantageous way. Use the keywords in titles, headings and descriptions – and be sure to place them at the start of a paragraph.

The use of keywords should, however, remain modest: the number one principle of SEO is always the relevance and readability of the content for the user. Google reacts negatively to the overuse of a specific word and punishes websites for this with lower rankings.

If you would like to learn more about SEO-optimised writing and read German, this article offers further Information.

Start your content marketing campaign today and get web-fit!

 

Katharine Eyre is a former lawyer, turned content marketing consultant and translator living and working in Vienna, Austria. While she is not busy translating legal texts from German into English, she focuses on building up her content marketing company, Content Instinct (www.contentinstinct.com).

Photo credit: http://www.seolinkbuilding.org/

The Five Steps to Charging on Value not on Price

Value

Today’s post is a guest post by my own coach, Vanessa Ugatti, The True Worth Expert. Over to Vanessa:

No doubt, you’ve heard it before – focus on value, not on price.  The question is are you doing that or not?  I would hazard a guess that many businesses pay lip service to this, rather than really doing it.  Fear dominates the world of commerce – there’s always someone willing to do it cheaper.  So let’s get straight to the point – no procrastination or shilly-shallying; it’s time to make a decision and the sooner you make it the better.  Neither path is easy; ultimately the choice is yours.

Step 1

Ask yourself the following question:

Do I want to be the person doing it cheaper?

If the answer is yes, keep on doing the same thing and I can guarantee that you will get the same results. Don’t bother reading this article either, because you’ll be wasting your time. On the other hand, if the answer is no, take a deep breath and carry on reading.

So far, so good.  If you’re still with me, you’ve successfully jumped over the first hurdle.  Well done.

Step 2

Ask yourself this: When was the last time I really looked at and understood my value?

For most people who have an expertise, it’s not easy to understand their value.  The longer they have been doing it, and the easier it has become, the more they take it for granted.  Consider the following:

  • How long did it take you to become a professional translator?
  • What did it cost you?
  • What did you have to give up while training/learning?
  • How long have you been a professional translator?
  • If you were to rate yourself in terms of how good you were when you first trained on a scale of 1-10, what figure would you put on it?
  • If you were to rate yourself in terms of how good you are now on a scale of 1-10, what figure would you put on it?

I will hazard a guess that it took years – longer than it took a chartered accountant to train, a doctor or even an architect.  It’s no mean feat.  Although I’m not a translator, I am a fluent French speaker and know how much time and effort was required to reach that stage. Remember you have gone beyond that level and are able to communicate a message effectively from one language into another. It’s an amazing skill and don’t you ever doubt it!  Are you starting to see your value?  If you don’t understand your own value, it will be unlikely that your clients will.  Understanding your value is something which takes time and you also need to review it on a regular basis.

Step 3

Ask yourself the following question:

Are the clients I’m working with in general the sort of clients who will pay me on value or are they looking for cheap and cheerful? 

If it’s the latter, then clearly you’re working with the wrong clients!  As previously mentioned, although I’m not a translator, I do know from coaching Karen that those of you who are working for agencies, for example, will definitely not be able to charge on value, as the agencies are dictating the prices and driving them down.

This situation means that you are not actually in control of your business; the agency acts as your employer, but without any of the benefits of actually being employed. This then erodes confidence, creates self-doubt and makes it harder to change.  It’s a vicious circle which needs to be broken.

Either way, you must target those clients who will value your service and pay you accordingly.  This may well mean making some radical changes in your business to be able to achieve this.  I would also encourage you to decide on a specialism so that your marketing can be focussed on a particular industry or profession.  As a generalist, you will be competing with all and sundry and therefore price will likely be the dictator.  On the other hand, as a specialist, you elevate yourself from the masses and it’s then that you can charge a premium for your expertise.

Step 4

Eliminating limiting beliefs

By now, I get the impression that you could be feeling a little overwhelmed.  If that’s the case, I apologise.  However, I’m not one of those fluffy people who say this is going to be easy.  If it was, everyone would be doing it.  Rome wasn’t built in a day; you’ll need focus, patience and determination to get where you want to.  Moreover, it’s not just about marketing and what you do practically; it’s also vital to work on yourself.   If you fail to do this, you’ll potentially limit your earnings and feel frustrated into the bargain.

What limiting beliefs do you have which are getting in the way of your success?

Karen is proof of what I’m saying.  She recently told me that because of the work we’ve been doing together, that she is now charging top fees to her clients and getting them, whereas before, that wasn’t happening.  Even though there are others in the marketplace willing to charge significantly less, (their competence level may or may not be as good as hers) because she now understands her value, both consciously and unconsciously, and has no qualms stating her fees, she is able to charge her true worth.

Step 5

Get help!  You can’t do it alone.  Be willing to invest in yourself.  Find the right people to support you on your journey.

Author biography:

Vanessa Ugatti, The True Worth Expert, coach, speaker and author of Amazon Bestseller, True Worth, dramatically shifts the thinking for people in professional services  taking them from their own perceptions of not feeling they can really charge what they are worth, to doing just that – and more! This unique ability, to bring out the best in people, has evolved for her over many years of facing similar challenges both professionally and personally, even questioning her own value in business. 

To access a complimentary copy of True Worth: How to Charge What You’re Worth and Get It, and to find out more, visit: www.thetrueworthexpert.com.

True Worth

 

 

 

 

Title photo credit: Got Credit

Focus on your goal – but don’t get ahead of yourself

The elevator to success is out of order

After talking to my mentee recently, I realised that it was perhaps about time I wrote a post on how to transition from where you are now to the better paid direct client market. Because it is, of course, a process and doesn’t happen overnight. The journey won’t be the same for everyone, however, so my aim in this article is to provide a few tips to point you in the right direction and to help you stay on track:

  1. Keep your sights on your goal – but don’t get impatient and don’t rush it

If you have been working exclusively or mainly for agencies for some years, there is no sense whatsoever in waking up one day and deciding to ditch all of those agencies so that you can start working for direct clients – as tempting as this may be – because, unless you have a magic wand, it’s going to take time to build up a direct client base. The important thing is to note the status quo and to ascertain what it is that you want to change and why (perhaps you would like to work with more direct clients because you think the work will be more rewarding, perhaps you want to find better paying clients so that you can work less whilst earning the same amount). It is important that you know your “what” and your “why” so that you can keep yourself focussed and on track.

  1. Step by step – replace clients successively

If you have been freelancing for a while you probably have at least a handful of different clients. Make a list of them and rate them according to categories that are important to you (e.g. good communication, fast payers, interesting work, rates, etc.). Do you already have some clients that you consider to be category A clients? If you do, make a list of all of the qualities and characteristics of those clients so that you know what you are looking for in new clients. If not, use your imagination. What qualities would your ideal category A clients have? When potential clients come along who seem to have these qualities and characteristics, you can start to replace the less than ideal clients on your list with these new clients. Be sure to do it successively and not to cross off all of your less than ideal clients at once: you still have to ensure that you are earning at least the same amount as before and ideally more.

  1. Create time for marketing – and do it

If you are currently working flat out for agencies to make ends meet, then you will need to claw back some time from somewhere in your day for marketing activities. Although it can sometimes feel like marketing is futile because it is unusual to see immediate results, constant steady marketing will bring you a steady stream of new clients over time and allow you to build your business in a gradual and healthy manner.

  1. Accept where you are now – and that growth is a gradual process

It is tempting to get frustrated and impatient about business growth but the fact is that you are where you are at the moment and you can’t change that for the present. By constantly taking steps, however small, towards your goal you will get there – in time. Just stick with it.

  1. Face your fears – and move past them

Many people find that the reason they can’t move forward with their business in the direction they want to go is that they are standing in their own way. Somewhere there is a misalignment between what they want to achieve and what they think they can achieve. There can be all kinds of reasons for this, usually based on past experience or the limiting beliefs they have grown up with. As a freelance translator you are your business’ most important asset. Personal development is a key aspect of business development and well worth considering undertaking if you find that you are struggling to reach your goals – or even to take the action which you hope will take you there.

Photo credit: Steps to success © Celestine Chua, http://www.flickr.com